Art Rotterdam

Van Nelle Fabriek, 10 - 13 February 2022

Art and Nature have always strengthened, inspired and are connected in many ways. In the spirit of Art and Nature, Rademakers Gallery presents four artists: Tomáš Libertíny, Joana Schneider, Florentijn de Boer and Johannes Langkamp. At Art Rotterdam, Rademakers Gallery always likes to present young talent, this year it is Johannes Langkamp. He will have the opportunity to share the stage with established artists such as Libertíny, Schneider and De Boer. Just like in nature, Rademakers Gallery focuses on growth and stimulation.

 

Tomáš Libertíny (1979) collaborates with nature and lets bees create his sculptures. He highlights the strength of the natural material by working with beeswax. What many people don't know is that beeswax is one of the most durable and strong materials in the world. This Libertíny's first attraction was to work with the bees. Later, he literally and figuratively zoomed in on the bees themselves. And through photography he portrays the contrast between vulnerability and strength by portraying the hard-working bee, maker of the sustainable beeswax, as a small helpless creature.

 

Joana Schneider (1990) also incorporates nature into her work, both in subject matter and material. Her masks, tapestries and sculptures are based on natural forms, plants and creatures. In her latest collections she refers to algae, waves, orchids, trees, gardens and stones. She also works in a sustainable way by constructing her works from found fishing ropes and then wrapping them with shiny PET wire. This PET wire was developed in the Textile Museum Tilburg and made from plastic (PET) bottles. This alternation of dull industrial rope and beautiful shine gives depth to the work. During Art Rotterdam she will mainly be seen in the exhibition Prospects of the Mondriaan Fund, because she is supported by the fund this year. She can also be found in our booth with small sculptural work.

 

Florentijn de Boer (1993) is visibly inspired by flora and fauna. Both human and animal aspects can be found in her paintings, which are located on the dividing line between abstract and figurative art. She herself says about this: “Each individual work is like a snapshot: a frozen moment in a story that then develops further, with characters that change, or as a glimpse into a fantastic landscape; or like a window to another world, a universe that stands alone.” The apparent contradictions between static and dynamic, form and plane, intrigue De Boer. She tries to capture this movement, transformation and transience of form on her canvas.

 

Johannes Langkamp (1985) presents his work as a young talent for the first time at Art Rotterdam. Langkamp zooms in even deeper on nature, until it almost touches physics. In his investigative way of working, he goes deeper into concepts such as movement, optical viewing and seeks out the tension between image and reality. He does this through video, photography and kinetic installations.